curriculum-koppoujutsushoden

Koppoujutsu Shoden

Koppoujutsu (骨法術) is an ancient form of armed and unarmed combat which focuses on striking bones and skeletal structure to break and knock down the opponent. Koppoujutsu shoden is a foundational module that teaches the basic principles and concepts of koppoujutsu.

The fundamentals of koppoujutsu are split into three levels; shoden, chuuden and jouden or beginner, intermediate and advanced.

Koppoujutsu shoden is made up of 18 forms split into three categories, postures [kamae] (構), engaging [daken] (打拳), and capturing [torite] (捕). These three areas are called Koppou Roppou Kamae, Koppou Roppou Daken and Koppou Roppou Torite respectively. Along with the daken are 6 hand striking postures called (hoken) [拳].   

These forms are designed to reinforce muscle memory and practice good martial habits.


Koppoujutsu Shoden Kamae - 骨法術初伝

Kamae (構) are postures or biomechanical structures of the body for specific use in both unarmed and armed combat. The kamae practiced in Koppoujutsu are derived from the Tiger Felling School (Koto Ryu).

Seigan no Kamae - 青眼の構 (True Eye Posture): The lead hand is in Kitenken pointing at the opponent's eyes, while the lead foot is forward pointing at the opponent. The rear hand is in Kitenken resting on the bicep of the lead arm, while the rear leg is at a right angle to the opponent. Koto Ryu seigan is shallow, feet shoulder width apart.

Bobi no Kamae - 防備の構 (Defensive Posture): The lead hand is in Niouken (仁王拳) pointing at the opponent's eyes, while the lead foot is forward pointing at the opponent. The rear hand is in Niouken resting on the hip, while the rear leg is at a right angle to the opponent. Bobi is very shallow, with both feet together.

Shizen no Kamae - 自然の構 (Natural Posture): The body is facing the opponent and the legs are shoulder width apart, parallel facing forward. The hands are in Kitenken resting on the pelvic inlet or the belt. 

Houko no Kamae - 抱圍の構 (Encircling Posture): The lead hand is forward in Kitenken pointing up, while the lead foot is forward pointing at the opponent. The rear hand is in Kitenken also pointing up but slightly off-set from the lead hand, while the rear leg is facing forward and also slightly off-set from the lead leg. Koto Ryu Houko is a shallow posture.

Hira Ichimonji no Kamae - 平一文字の構 (Level Straight Line Posture): The body is facing the opponent and both arms are stretched out in a straight line. Both hands are in Kitenken. The posture is shallow.


Sukimi no Kamae - 隙楣の構 (Shoulder Yoke Posture): The body is facing the opponent and both arms are stretched out in a straight line. Both hands are in Kitenken. The legs are crossed (sokushin sokuhou). The posture is shallow.

Koppoujutsu kamae serve as the core foundation of movement in the Tiger Felling School (Koto Ryu). The idea of kamae is to maintain posture through movement in both attack and defence. Kamae allow the practitioner to maintain a combat posture that transitions into striking or grappling, without having to think about movement. These kamae should be programmed into the body's muscle memory.


Koppoujutsu Shoden Houken - 骨法術初伝宝拳

Hōken (宝拳) are the striking postures of the limbs of the Tiger Felling School (Koto Ryuu).


Niou Ken - 仁王拳 (Deva fist): Clenched fist, thumb resting on the index finger.

Kiten Ken - 起転拳 (Turning fist): Fingers are clenched together facing forward in a cupping action with the thumb locked in on the side. 

Happa Ken - 八葉拳 (Eight Leaves fist): Hand is open. Fingers are together and slightly bent. 

Koppou Ken - 骨法拳 (Thumb Bone fist): Clenched fist, thumb on top of index finger in bent shape. 

Shikan Ken - 指環拳 (Ring Finger fist): Fingers together, but fully bent. Striking with the tip of the bent finger.

Hagi Ken - 拳 (Shin fist): Shin.

The striking postures protect the fingers and hands. They are vital to the effectiveness of the striking postures (kamae).

Koppoujutsu Shoden Daken - 骨法術初伝打拳

Daken (打拳) refers six basic techniques (waza) [技] that are designed to align the body and teach proper biomechanics. These daken are the basic striking forms of Koppoujutsu and form the foundation of attack and defence.

Joudan Tsuki - 上段突 (high thrust): This waza begins from seigan no kamae. Transition into houko no kamae with sokushin sokuhou (cross step) and at the same time strike with a high thrust (joudan tsuki) with the fist in niouken. Reset to seigan no kamae. 

Gedan Tsuki - 下段突 (low thrust)This waza begins from bobi no kamae. Transition into sokushin sokuhou (cross step) and at the same time strike with a low thrust (gedan tsuki) with the fist in niouken. Reset to bobi no kamae. 

Jakkin Tsukihagi -  弱骨指端下 (shoulder joint strike and kick)From shizen no kamae, transition with sokushin sokuhou (cross step) while raising one hand to guard, then strike with shikan ken (ring finger fist) to the jakkin (shoulder joint), followed by a kick with hagi ken (shin kick). Reset to shizen no kamae.

Happa Tsukihagi -  八葉突 (palm strike and kick)From shizen no kamae, transition with sokushin sokuhou (cross step) while raising both hands into houko no kamae, kick with hagi ken (shin kick) and then immediately strike to the face with happa ken (palm strike). Reset to shizen no kamae.

Koppou Tsukihagi - 骨法骭 (thumb bone strike and kick)From hira ichimonji no kamae, sokushin sokuhou (cross step) and immediately strike with koppou ken to the kasumi (temple). Follow up with a hagi ken (shin kick) to the pelvis. Reset to hira ichimonji no kamae. 

Ryoute Happa Tsukihagi - 両手八葉突 (double clap and kick)From hira ichimonji no kamae, sokushin sokuhou (cross step) and immediately kick with hagi ken (shin kick) to the pelvis. Follow up with a double happa ken (hand clap) to head. Reset to hira ichimonji no kamae. 

Koppoujutsu daken teach the basic striking methods of the Tiger Felling School (Koto Ryuu). Embedded within the koppoujutsu daken are simple concepts of striking high or low to set up the next strike or kick. Koppoujutsu daken transitions easily into throwing and grappling techniques.

Koppoujutsu Shoden Torite - 骨法術初伝捕手

Torite (捕手) are basic grabbing techniques to set the opponent up for a strike or throw. 

Eri Dori - 襟捕 (Lapel Capture): Shift across with sokushin sokuhou (cross step) while grabbing the lapel. Pull the opponent in with the drop and shift them across when opening out of sokushin sokuhou.

Hiji Dori - 肘捕 (Elbow Capture): Shift across with sokushin sokuhou (cross step) while grabbing the elbow. Pull the opponent in with the drop and shift them across when opening out of sokushin sokuhou.

Erihiji Dori - 肘捕 (Lapel and Elbow Capture): Shift across with sokushin sokuhou (cross step) while grabbing the lapel and elbow. Pull the opponent in with the drop and shift them across when opening out of sokushin sokuhou.

Tekubi Dori - 手首捕 (Wrist Capture): Shift across with sokushin sokuhou (cross step) while grabbing the inside of the wrist and/or the lapel. Pull the opponent in with the drop while pulling the wrist down to the hip and shift them across when opening out of sokushin sokuhou.

Ryoute Eri Dori - 両手 (Double Lapel Capture): Shift across with sokushin sokuhou (cross step) while grabbing both lapels. Pull the opponent in with the drop and shift them across when opening out of sokushin sokuhou.

Ryoute Mune Dori - 両手胸捕 (Double Chest Capture): Shift across with sokushin sokuhou (cross step) while grabbing the inside right lapel and lower left lapel. Pull the opponent in and choke with the drop and then shift them across when opening out of sokushin sokuhou.

Torite are critical for capturing or locking down the opponent. These techniques are designed to counter a draw for a weapon or concealed weapon. The torite techniques also allow the drawing of concealed weapons, while the opponent is off balance.