curriculum-taihenjutsuchuuden

Taihenjutsu Chuuden (体変術中伝)

Taihenjutsu chuuden (体変術中伝) is part of the Taishinki (体心気) and the next module after Taihenjutsu shoden. Taihenjutsu chuuden is a training framework module that teaches principles of balance, distance and posture. 

Taihenjutsu is designed to strengthen the body, align posture and teach break falling methods. 

Taihenjutsu chuuden is made up of 18 drills split into three categories; paired movement [kumiugoki] (組動), rising evasion drills [kekki kaihi keiko] (回避稽古) and break-falling drills [ukemi keiko] (受身稽古). These three areas are called Taihenjutsu Roppou Kumiugoki, Taihenjutsu Roppou Kekki Kaihi Keiko and Taihenjutsu Roppou Ukemi Keiko respectively. 

These drills are designed to reinforce muscle memory, practice balance, identify distance and practice good martial habits. 

Paired Movement [Kumiugoki] (組動)

Kumiugoki are paired movement exercises where the giver (tori) will advance on the receiver (uke) and vice versa. The purpose of these paired exercises is to understand distance and the flow of the opponent. 

[一] Small Steps Movement [Kumiugoki Shouho] (組動小歩): The tori matches the uke's posture and advances on them using shouho. The uke moves back, maintaining distance. 

[二] Big Steps Movement [Kumiugoki Daiho] (組動大歩): The tori matches the uke's posture and advances on them using daiho. The uke moves back, maintaining distance. 

[三] Posture Steps Movement [Kumiugoki Kamaeho] (組動構歩): The tori matches the uke's posture and advances on them using kamaeho, the wrists of the uke and tori are touching. The uke moves back, maintaining distance. The wrists of both uke and tori naturally meet. 

[四] Paired unilateral walking [Kumiugoki Nanba Aruki] (組動南蛮歩): The tori is in front. The uke is behind and matches the tori's posture. As the tori runs forward, the uke follows. After running 66 shaku (20 metres) the tori stops, then begins to run backwards using nanba aruki, the uke moves back.

[五] Paired Quiet walking [Kumiugoki Muon Aruki] (組動無音歩): The tori is in front. The uke is behind and matches the tori's posture. As the tori moves forward, the uke follows. After moving 66 shaku (20 metres) the tori stops, then begins to move backwards using muon aruki, the uke moves back.

[六] Paired Side walking [Kumiugoki Yoko Aruki] (組動横歩): The tori is in front, perpendicular to the direction of travel. The uke is next to the tori and matches the tori's posture. As the tori moves forward, the uke follows, every second step touching the hands. After moving 66 shaku (20 metres) the tori stops, then begins to move backwards using yoko aruki, the uke moves back.

The kumiugoki are split into two main areas, adversarial movement and coordinated movement. The first three drills practice flow between a defender and an attacker, the last three drills practice staying in synchronous with a leader. Together, these drills teach the basic movement of Gyokkoha for an individual or small team.

Rising Evasion Drills [Kekki Kaihi Keiko] (決起回避稽古)

Kekki kaihi keiko are rising evasion drills where the uke is on the ground and receiving an attack from the tori who is attacking from a standing position. The first three techniques rise from lying on the stomach and the last three techniques rise from a lying on the back position.

[一] Monkey Rise [Saru Kekki] (猿決起): The uke is lying down on the stomach. The tori kicks from the front and the uke rises to the saru kamae, before jumping back to a standing position.

[二] Bear Rise [Kuma Kekki] (熊決起): The uke is lying down on the stomach. The tori kicks from behind and the uke rises to the kuma kamae, before jumping forward to a standing position.

[三] Cat Rise [Neko Kekki] (猫決起): The uke is lying down on the stomach. The tori kicks from the side and the uke rises to the neko kamae, before jumping to the side into a standing position.

[四] Toad Rise [Hikigaeru Kekki] (蟇蛙決起): The uke is lying down on the back. The tori kicks from the front and the uke rolls onto to the side to the hikigaeru kamae, before jumping back to a standing position.

[五] Salamander Rise [Sanshouuo Kekki] (山椒魚決起): The uke is lying down on the back. The tori kicks from behind and the uke rises rolls to the side into the sanshouuo kamae, before jumping forward to a standing position.

[六] Lizard Rise [Tokage Kekki] (蜥蜴決起): The uke is lying down on the back. The tori kicks from the side and the uke rolls to the side to the tokage kamae, before jumping up to a standing position.

These rising techniques are important transition positions for both ukemi and rising quickly to the feet after being thrown or pushed over. It is important to practice them often after falling. 

Break-falling Drills [Ukemi Keiko] (受身稽古)

The ukemi keiko drills are done by the tori pushing or pulling the uke from four directions, and the uke taking ukemi. These drills are best done with the uke closing their eyes, so they cannot anticipate the direction of the attack. 

[一] Forward break-fall Drill [Zenpou Ukemi Keiko] (前方受身稽古): The tori kneels behind the uke in hanza and grabs both ankles, pulling back. The uke drops forward using zenpou ukemi.

[二] Backward break-fall Drill [Kouhou Ukemi Keiko] (後方受身稽古): The tori kneels in front of the uke in hanza and grabs one leg, placing one hand around the ankle and pulling, while placing the other hand on the thigh and pushing. The uke drops back in kouhou ukemi. 

[三] Sideward break-fall Drill [Sokuhou Ukemi Keiko] (側方受身稽古): The tori kneels beside the uke in hanza, places one hand on the ankle and pulls, while placing the other hand on the thigh and pushes. The uke drops to the side in sokuhou ukemi. 

[四] Forward roll Drill [Zenpou Kaiten Keiko] (前方回転稽古): The tori pushes the uke from behind and the uke drops forward and rolls using zenpou kaiten. 

[五] Backward roll Drill [Kouhou Kaiten Keiko] (後方回転稽古): The tori pushes the uke from the front and the uke drops back and rolls using kouhou kaiten. 

[六] Sideways roll Drill [Sokuhou Kaiten Keiko] (側方回転稽古): The tori pushes the uke from the side and the uke drops to the side and rolls using sokuhou kaiten. 


The ukemi keiko practice break-falling in four directions from both a push or a grab and pull. These drills should be practiced on soft surfaces such as mats or grass.